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Face to Face

ComFace to Faceing Face to Face with Your(My)self

You may not expect to come face to face with yourself when writing fiction. After all, it is fiction. Though some writers may not come face to face with themselves, I’ve come to learn many do, and I’m one.

What do I mean by coming face to face with yourself? It starts out with random distraction, thoughts, emotions, and more distraction. Then, if you’re willing to see, clarity dawns. Clarity—what’s bad about that, you might ask? Oh, nothing. It’s all good. Clarity brought me face to face with the nebulous but just as real things like:

  • How easily distracted I can be, especially, but not exclusively, with the eyes of a house dobby. (Look, therHouse Dobby Edited from Public Domain Photoe’s dust! What’s dust doing in wind-blown New Mexico? I just dusted yesterday. Look, a shiny thing! Must investigate. Should I do the laundry?)
  • (Let’s call it) the flexibility continuum of my self-confidence. (What made me think I could switch from writing network security plans in governmentese to novels in real English? Who are Shrunk and White, again? )
  • The naked truth of being worthy, or not to (do this writing thing, have the freedom to explore writing, or leave the security (pun intended) of my previous career?).
  • Resistance. Yep, it’s a thing, even if you want to write and you like it. Seriously, there are books about it, like The War of Art by Steven Pressfield.

And the inevitable reactions of the above when coming face to face with reality:

  • What do they mean, writing is only 10% of getting a book published!?! What’s a platform?
  • Editing is intense. Then there’s more editing. And more, more, more. (Must be time to put the medium colors in the washer. Where’s my sock? Maybe Super Spouse will pick something up for dinner.)

The Really Good News

The good news is that there are others—writers, artists, and compassionate other humans with clear intuition, empathy and intellect. I may not remember this during week three or so of not having left the office/house. Then, as if my good fairy has waved her magic wand, a text, email, call, or my spousal unit will remind me. Then, I again come face to face with who I am, why I am doing this, and that I love it.


New fiction author, Tanya D. Dawson, has written a story for the young adult in all of us. Her pending novel, Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel [working title], brightens the sometimes dark world of YA and delivers the angst and the weird in this inspiring becoming-who-you-are adventure of mystery, intrigue, and mysticism grounded in today’s world. While Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel is primarily set on the West Coast, Tanya lives and works in the American Southwest.

Pizza Power

Pizza Power

Have you contemplated the power of pizza?

I’m not talking about the robust declarations of definitive bests:

  • Crust―thick, thin, deep dish, white, sourdough, whole grain….
  • Shape―round, square, avant garde….
  • Sauces―tomato sauce, pesto, oil….
  • Cheeses and toppings―don’t get me started!
  • Who’s got the best―Chicago, New York, San Francisco, Naples, Sidney, Mumbai….?
  • Fingers or fork?
  • Folded or flat?

I am referring to underlying dimensions of pizza’s power.

Pizza draws people together.

Announcing, “Pizza’s here!” is like ringing a really loud bell. Folks from everywhere come running.

Have your ever noticed how company meetings are well attended when there’s pizza? Back in the day in the U.S. Air Force, I learned help with moving was guaranteed with a pizza party. Even for the picky eaters, there’s always a chance there’ll be a slice.

Pizza doesn’t discriminate.

As a people, we pizza eaters happily and hungrily cross every divide in society to get that slice. We share our favorites with others. We brag which is truly the best and where to get it. Some may share my spousal-unit’s favorite of traditional pepperoni and cheese pizza, go for the veggies, or stand among the adventurous. There are gluten-free’ers and ones who have to watch our cheeses. One thing’s for sure, we all love our pizza.

Pizza encourages individual choice.

In my novel, pizza makes many appearances. When it comes to pizza night at Anderson Lighthouse, pizza is all about choice. Maria Elena transforms the kitchen worktable and teaches the art of pizza building. She first provides a foundation of crust. Characters move around the worktable choosing sauces, the pre- and post-bake toppings, and condiments. (Red pepper flakes, anyone?)

Maria Elena’s pizza-building station comes from a personal life lesson. Many years ago, my friend Sarah taught me that choice matters. “Choose your slice,” she said. Sarah expected me to look at the whole pizza and pick the one I wanted. Up until then I was a default slice eater. She taught me I had choice in life in that one single exercise. Now that’s pizza power!

There’s healing power in pizza.

In later chapters, a daring mission is happily and successfully completed. Pizza creates a spontaneous celebration. Rescuers elicit shy smiles from the rescued as they come together over pizza pie.

In real life, pizza was delivered as I wrote last week’s blog post. The arrival of pizza boxes signified the near end to several difficult days. Their slices represented normalcy. Real or imagined (is there a difference?), they provided emotional solace. The pizzas were lukewarm and Super Spouse’s choice of red sauce tasted better than my pesto. It didn’t matter. Pizza has that kind of power.

Taking a cue from my character Georgie, I wish you pizza.

_____

New fiction author, Tanya D. Dawson, has written a story for the young adult in all of us. Her pending novel, Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel [working title], brightens the sometimes dark world of YA and delivers the angst and the weird in this inspiring becoming-who-you-are adventure of mystery, intrigue, and mysticism grounded in today’s world. While Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel is primarily set on the West Coast, Tanya lives and works in the American Southwest.

Getting Personal

Getting Personal

Trip to Tucson

The instructors, Reid Tracy and Cheryl Richardson, told us in the Hay House workshop (ref my December 5, 2017 post) we need to get personal, to let people get to know us. I am convinced I heard the collective, internal groans from the writers in the room at this remark. We can be a private lot.

I get the idea of learning about people. I like to read about my favorite writers. Does knowing a little bit about them or the region they live in help inform her or his writing? [Shrug] Beats me.

Here’s me being personal. This weekend I am in Tucson, Arizona with hubby to hang out with my sister following her surgery. It’s been an emotionally rough last few days because it was a scary surgery. She’s a trooper and we got her home this afternoon.

Last night, Super Spouse took me to a two-story Barnes & Noble for a night cap in the cafe (him, hot chocolate and me, iced Tazo Passion tea) because he figured it would help me feel better. He was right. I love being surrounded by books. And I like that Passion tea. ?

Future Location of My Novel

Right now I’m in my pj’s in the hotel waiting for delivery of hubby’s favorite meal, pizza, and watching the SAG awards. He loves all the awards shows and I kind of like them too. We’ll be back home by tomorrow. I’m going to take a long nap.

Enough about me. (Pizza’s here.) Like we say around these parts, hasta entonces (until then).

Popping Up Like a Prairie Dog

Popping Up Like a Prairie Dog

Hey, everybody!  I am popping up like a prairie dog from a mountain of paperwork to check in.

My prairie dog is a little like Tron racing through a changing digital labyrinth. I leave my self breadcrumbs in real life and digitally while I shape and reshape the worlds of fiction with Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel [working title]. My editor at kn literary arts has me hopping to create the best novel and book proposal I can. (Thanks, Rebecca!)

On occasion I pop up to say hi or head to the grocery store. More likely, I text Mom a good morning and jump back into it with my first cup of Darjeeling.

Popping Up Like a Prairie Dog! New Young Adult Fiction Author Tanya D. Dawson checking in again

While I’m here I want to say thanks to everyone for your support, especially my super spouse (I noticed the absence of blonde dog hair clouds wafting next to the hallway baseboards. You’re the best!), my neglected friends and family, and team players from The Hett Agency, and Sullivan Design, LLC.

~~~

New fiction author, Tanya D. Dawson, has written a story for the young adult in all of us. Her pending novel, Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel [working title], brightens the sometimes dark world of YA and delivers the angst and the weird in this inspiring adventure of mystery, intrigue, and mysticism grounded in today’s world. While Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel is primarily set on the West Coast, Tanya lives and works in the American Southwest.