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Face to Face

ComFace to Faceing Face to Face with Your(My)self

You may not expect to come face to face with yourself when writing fiction. After all, it is fiction. Though some writers may not come face to face with themselves, I’ve come to learn many do, and I’m one.

What do I mean by coming face to face with yourself? It starts out with random distraction, thoughts, emotions, and more distraction. Then, if you’re willing to see, clarity dawns. Clarity—what’s bad about that, you might ask? Oh, nothing. It’s all good. Clarity brought me face to face with the nebulous but just as real things like:

  • How easily distracted I can be, especially, but not exclusively, with the eyes of a house dobby. (Look, therHouse Dobby Edited from Public Domain Photoe’s dust! What’s dust doing in wind-blown New Mexico? I just dusted yesterday. Look, a shiny thing! Must investigate. Should I do the laundry?)
  • (Let’s call it) the flexibility continuum of my self-confidence. (What made me think I could switch from writing network security plans in governmentese to novels in real English? Who are Shrunk and White, again? )
  • The naked truth of being worthy, or not to (do this writing thing, have the freedom to explore writing, or leave the security (pun intended) of my previous career?).
  • Resistance. Yep, it’s a thing, even if you want to write and you like it. Seriously, there are books about it, like The War of Art by Steven Pressfield.

And the inevitable reactions of the above when coming face to face with reality:

  • What do they mean, writing is only 10% of getting a book published!?! What’s a platform?
  • Editing is intense. Then there’s more editing. And more, more, more. (Must be time to put the medium colors in the washer. Where’s my sock? Maybe Super Spouse will pick something up for dinner.)

The Really Good News

The good news is that there are others—writers, artists, and compassionate other humans with clear intuition, empathy and intellect. I may not remember this during week three or so of not having left the office/house. Then, as if my good fairy has waved her magic wand, a text, email, call, or my spousal unit will remind me. Then, I again come face to face with who I am, why I am doing this, and that I love it.


New fiction author, Tanya D. Dawson, has written a story for the young adult in all of us. Her pending novel, Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel [working title], brightens the sometimes dark world of YA and delivers the angst and the weird in this inspiring becoming-who-you-are adventure of mystery, intrigue, and mysticism grounded in today’s world. While Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel is primarily set on the West Coast, Tanya lives and works in the American Southwest.

Meet Katie, Canine Coworker & Officemate

Meet Katie, Canine Coworker & Officemate

Katie

Katie

Katie, a perpetually shedding, half Beagle/half Shiba Inu, is my friend, canine coworker and officemate.

She follows me from room to room and stations herself somewhere between the door and me, either to guard or keep me in place.

Early mornings we both assume the positions for meditation and yoga/stretching. However, Katie’s role is more supervisory.

At break time she leaves for solar therapy and can be found sunning herself either outdoors or indoors, depending on her druthers.

As a writer’s assistant, Katie-dog:

Katie Downward Dog

Katie Downward Dog

  • Is a good beta manuscript listener (but not too big on providing feedback).
  • Provides a welcome focal point for me to stare as I work out a sentence or plot issue.
  • Seeks affection just as I need to return to the moment from wherever my mind has wandered.
  • Keeps the love flowing and gratitude rolling in.

And they say a writer’s life is solitary!

New fiction author, Tanya D. Dawson, has written a story for the young adult in all of us. Her pending novel, Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel, brightens the sometimes dark world of YA to deliver the angst and the weird in this inspiring adventure of mystery, intrigue, and mysticism grounded in today’s world. While Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel is primarily set on the West Coast, Tanya lives and works in the American Southwest.

Lessons Learning — Knowing Now What We Now Know is Okay (Distractions)

Lessons Learning — Knowing Now What We Now Know is Okay (Distractions)

I know we don’t know what we don’t know. Still, sometimes I wish I had known some of what I’ve learned over the past few years a long time ago, don’t you? I allow wistfulness its brief moment but move on to appreciate my lessons—not fully learned, but learning.

For example, did you know distractions are addictive? I heard that from another writer and it sent me spinning to take inventory of my own distracted behavior.

Say I’m teetering on what a character will say. Can she stay PG-13 while she blurts out what she is truly feeling?

Hmm. Must be time to put the whites in to soak. While I’m out and about, I might as well put the dishes away. I’m feeling peckish. What’s in the fridge? I haven’t texted Mom this morning. Should I have another cup of tea?

I am learning that some distractions can be used to mentally process writing, especially those distractions that take more than thirty seconds. Sweeping is a good one, as is mopping. Why can’t my character say what she wants? Blurt away, girl! As the writer, I can always edit the paragraph later if necessary. Let it rip!

I must also confess to allowing distraction to become its own subject. These telling, free flowing thoughts from last year could have just as easily been yesterday’s:

“I can’t stand dirty floors. A clean floor is good to have. Mopping can distract me from feeling unworthy. Sweeping is sometimes good enough.”

Dust and digital devices are my greatest distractions. I am learning to manage the devices, but the dust? Let’s just say I’d like to turn that from an obsession to a distraction. Lol.

See what I mean about lessons learning?

Enough now. Back to editing the novel.

New fiction author, Tanya D. Dawson, has written a story for the young adult in all of us. Her pending novel, Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel, brightens the sometimes dark world of YA to deliver the angst and the weird in this inspiring adventure of mystery, intrigue, and mysticism grounded in today’s world. While Andersen Light: A Mystic Creek Novel is primarily set on the West Coast, Tanya lives and works in the American Southwest.